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Amish People

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Amish People
Amish People

Amish people follow a
religion started in 1693 by
Swiss Mennonite, Jacob
Amman, from where the
word “Amish” is derived.  
As Anabaptist Christians,
the Amish people started
as a reformation group
within the Mennonite
religion, to restore earlier
teachings and practices
they believed were lost.
Amish People
Are Amish people nice?  Yes!  
Amish people are some of the
kindest, hardest working,
most honest individuals one
could hope to meet.  Not only
are Amish people interesting
to observe, but they are a
reminder to all of us about the
value found within our own
simplistic, ancestral roots.
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Amish
The Amish people separated due to what they believed was a lack of
discipline among the Mennonite community.  Some Amish people
migrated to the United States, starting in the early 18th century.  
Amish people initially settled in Pennsylvania and later migrated to
many other states, including Ohio and Indiana, which still have
significant Amish communities, today.  The Amish people are of
Swiss-German ancestry, and marry within the Amish community.  

The Amish people have attempted to preserve some of the elements
of their late 17th century European culture, thus avoiding many
modern-day practices, somewhat isolating themselves from typical American society.  Most
Amish people speak both English and Pennsylvania Dutch, which is a dialect of German with
some English influence.  There are different orders within the Amish people, such as the Old
Order Amish which use horses for transportation and farming, and do not allow electricity and
telephones within their homes. Other Amish orders have less restriction.  The Amish people are
divided into separate fellowships based upon geographical congregations or districts.  Each
district has its own set of rules, and Old Order churches still practice shunning or even expelling
Amish people who violate their own district's rules.        Also see:
Amish & Mennonite Heritage